In this tutorial we will cover the steps needed to install the Horde webmail client on your CentOS 6.4, Debian or Ubuntu platform.

Requirements

Install Horde

CentOS 6.4:

Due to the fact that some of the required packages might not be available by default you will need first to add the EPEL repository to your Linux platform. This can be done with the following command:

After that we can install Horde using the yum default package manager:

You will be prompted to accept the installation and additional packages will be installed.

Debian:

We will need first to add the Debian Jessue repository:

We can go ahead updating the repository list and installing Horde:

You will be prompted to accept the installation and additional packages will be installed.

Ubuntu:

We can install the Horde3 framework directly using the aptitude package manager:

Configure Horde

CentOS 6.4:

After its installation we should make some changes to the default configuration files. By default, everyone accessing Horde is automatically logged in as 'Administrator'. This is a security risk! It is very important that you change the authentication backend under the 'Authentication' tab. This is why, Horde is currently only accessible from localhost. We should edit the following configuration file and allow temporary access to our currect IP address (http://www.whatismyip.com/).

where X.X.X.X is our current IP address.

After that the Apache service should be restarted:

We should create a Horde database using one of the sample scripts provided by the installation package. Open the file and change the password for the database which will be created to a desired one:

After that we can use that SQL file to create the Horde database with name horde and username assigned to it with the same name:

When the authentication configuration is completed we can comment the lines:

in order for all visitors to be able to access the Horde webmail client.

Make sure that the Apache service is allowed to write to the Horde configuration folder:

After that you should be able to access the Horde setup page through your browser:

where X.X.X.X is your server's IP address.

An easy way to find your server's IP address is to execute the following command:

Debian:

We will need first to setup the main configuration file:

After that edit the Apache virtual host file with the following content:

Restart the Apache service:

Now we can create a MySQL database which will work with the Horde application. Create the following SQL file:

After that execute the SQL query which will create database called horde and username horde with password pass123

You will be prompted to fill in the MySQL root password.

Make sure that the Apache service is allowed to write to the Horde configuration folder:

We can continue the installation process running the webmail-install script:

You will be prompted to fill in Horde configuration information:

Now you should be able to access the Horde setup page through your browser:

where X.X.X.X is your server's IP address.

An easy way to find your server's IP address is to execute the following command:

Ubuntu:

Let's first edit the /etc/horde/horde3/config.php file and comment the following lines:

After that create an Apache virtual host file with the following configuration:

Enable the virtual host and restart the Apache service:

We should create a Horde database using one of the sample scripts provided by the installation package:

After that open the file and change the password for the database which will be created to a desired one:

After that we can use that SQL file to create the Horde database with name horde and username assigned to it with the same name:

Make sure that the Apache service is allowed to write to the Horde configuration folder:

After that you should be able to access the Horde setup page through your browser:

where X.X.X.X is your server's IP address.

An easy way to find your server's IP address is to execute the following command: